They Called It The Streak!

 

st-markI am old enough to remember streaking back in the early1970s. I suppose it still happens today. But, with many people’s wardrobe choices it can be hard to tell if they are streaking or dressed! And, as the morals in my country have been constantly eroding, I am not sure there would be a public out cry if someone was found to be streaking. I am not even sure too many people would bother to sat, “Don’t look Ethel!” But, have treated streaking (in the 70s) as if it was something new; when, in fact, as Christians, we can at eh very least trace streaking back to the biblical days.

On 29 April we are set to celebrate Saint Mark.  I always read with amusement as a child Mark 14:51, “And a young man followed him, with nothing but a linen cloth about his body. And they seized him, but he left the linen cloth and ran away naked.” Yet, as I studied the scripture more maturely the verse became less funny and more sorrowful. While St. Mark never says that he is that young man, tradition and scholarship have come to the conclusion that ‘young man’ is in fact the Gospel writer.

The episode adds nothing to the Jesus Story. Yet, for some reason the writer preserved the story. One reason many scholars believe the story was kept was that the young man who ran away naked was none other than Mark himself.

Mark sets out his Gospel with a thesis statement: The beginning of the good news [the gospel] of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (Mark 1:1). And throughout his Gospel that thesis is asserted, but not by the people who Christ is trying to ‘win over.’ The Demons know who he is. A very shaky reply from Peter that could almost be phrased as a question as much as statement, says He’s the Messiah. And, of course, the final proclamation in Mark 15:39, “surely this man is the son of G(g)od,” leaves one to wonder just which god the centurion was referencing!

As we approach the feast day of St. Mark, 25 March, which Christ do we worship and proclaim? Do our own demons know more about the Christ than we do and keep us from worshipping? Or, are we like Peter and say his is the Messiah in more of a question form than a statement? Maybe, you proclaim that surely this man is the Son of God; but he is a God you’ve made him into as opposed to the God of the Bible, a thoroughly modern and updated god. Or even sadder, maybe you are willing to simply run away naked instead of being identified with the one true God.

St. Mark gave us sign post that the Christ was God’s Son, the true Messiah of Israel. As we remember St. Mark let us remember he told us about the “good news of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.” And he proclaimed throughout his book that “Surely this man must be the Son of God.” From the beginning to the end, and all points in the middle, Mark made the case that the Christ is our savior!

Until next time May the Good Lord Bless and Keep You!

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